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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,976 (some duplicates have been removed)
tremendous economic financial pressure on the entire global economy, including europe. >> in the same way in which the collapse of lehman implied global shocks, a dissolve in the situation of the eurozone is going to impact the united states. >> while everyone is telling the germans, "bail these guys out now," the germans are saying, "if we're gonna bail them out, we wanna fix the political crisis." >> at the end of the day, europe and the eurozone face an existential question: can we become the united states of europe? >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about th
. >> it had been a long time coming, but at last david cameron delivered his big speech in europe. he began with what had gone wrong. not everyone, he said, wanted ever closer european union integration, a more flexible approach was required. >> if we do not address these challenges, the danger is that europe will fail and the british people will drift towards the exit. i do not want that to happen. i want the european union to be a success and i want a relationship to keep us in it. >> the prime minister said that the main problem was the growing gap between the union and its citizens, the disillusionment was at an all-time high in the uk. >> countries are different. they make different choices. we cannot harmonize everything. >> he said the solution was to try to claw back hours from the european union and, once that was done, put it to the people. >> once we have negotiated a new settlement, we will give the british people referendum with a very simple in or out choice to stay in the european union on these new terms or to come out altogether. it will be an inner out referendum. >> pro-e
strategy. on issue of europe haven't always agreed. he was a leading proponent of britain joining the single currency and i've always been opposed to the. on issue of the referendum i gently remind my right honorable friend he was in that referendum was very much part of his manifesto of the last election. [shouting] >> in the interest of harmony i think we'll leave that to one side. >> mr. speaker, a constituent of mine with a chronic medical condition tells me that he is just 20 pounds a week to spend on food and clothing after paying his utility bills, and after april after the welfare cuts in april, he will just have to pounds a day. if the prime minister police we're all in it together, with the agreed to review the impact on the very poorest of the welfare cuts so that my constituents sacrifices are in line with his own? >> i will look very close to what the honorable gentleman says and the circumstances. let me just make the point, if you compare 2013 with 2010 in terms of the level of key benefits, it is worth making this point. and unemployed person on jobseeker's allowan
for britain, but good for europe too. >> i do not think that was quite a complete answer to my question. let us see if we can press the prime minister a bit further about how he is going to vote. is he saying that if he does not achieve his negotiating strategy, he will recommend-a part-time chancellor can hang on a minute. is he saying that if he does not achieve his negotiating strategy, he will recommend that britain leads the european union? >> it is are welcome that the right honorable gentleman is accepting the promise -- a promise that conservatives will win. interestingly, not reason the fact that the unemployment figures are down once again today. employment is up by 90,000 this quarter, and the rate of job growth last year was the fastest since 1989. i answered his question very clearly. i want to see a strong britain in a reformed europe. we have a clear plan. we want to reset the relationship. we will hold the referendum. we were correct -- recommend that resettlement to the british people. has he got a clue what he would do? >> the clue is in the title -- prime minister's questi
europe. [laughter] is he glad those days are over? [laughter] >> i think, i think that even the leader of the labour party should accept the fact that it is a massive change taking place in europe. a change that is being driven by the changes in the eurozone, and and, frankly, this country faces a choice and political parties in this country faces a choice, do we look at these changes and see what we can do to maximize britain's national interest and do we consult the public about that, or do we set back, do nothing, until the public to go home? i know where i stand. i know where this party stands, and that's in the national interest. >> ed miliband. >> well, let's hope we can find out what he does than today, mr. speaker. i should i suppose congratulate them on one thing, i'm having decide on the date of this speech. well done, well done. another example of the rolls-royce operation of number 10 downing street. [laughter] now, mr. speaker, in advance of his speech, investors need to know what britain did the european union in five years time? >> on important decisions can a first of a
much of their time banging on about europe. [laughter] is he glad those days are over? [laughter] >> i think, i think that even the leader of the labour party should accept the fact that it is a massive change taking place in europe. a change that is being driven by the changes in the eurozone, and and, frankly, this country faces a choice and political parties in this country faces a choice, do we look at these changes and see what we can do to maximize britain's national interest and do we consult the public about that, or do we set back, do nothing, until the public to go home? i know where i stand. i know where this party stands, and that's in the national interest. >> ed miliband. >> well, let's hope we can find out what he does than today, mr. speaker. i should i suppose congratulate them on one thing, i'm having decide on the date of this speech. well done, well done. another example of the rolls-royce operation of number 10 downing street. [laughter] now, mr. speaker, in advance of his speech, investors need to know what britain did the european union in five years time? >> on
for europe, to. >> i don't think that was quite a complete answer to my question, mr. speaker. let's see if we can press them a bit further about how he is going to vote. is he saying, is he saying that if he doesn't achieve his negotiating strategy he will recommend a part-time cancer -- the part-time chancellor can't hang on for a minute. is he saying if he doesn't achieve his negotiation strategy he will recommend britain lead the european union? >> first of all is very welcome, it's accepting the premise the conservatives will win the next election. [cheers and applause] >> and interestingly, an interest in not raising the fact the unemployment figures are down once again today. employment is up why 90,000 this quarter, and the rate of job growth last year was the fastest since 1989. but i answered his question very clearly. i want to see a strong britain in a reformed europe. we have a very clear plan. we want to reset the relationship. we will hold of that referendum that we were recommend that we settlement to the british people. the question now is for him. has he got a clue what
wilbur mentioned that i would be talking mainly about europe, but i also have some things to say about japan. we're now in the fourth year, entering the fourth year of the crisis in europe, and it's certainly a long shadow. i think it's fair to say that the problems of new york have caused major problems worldwide with the size of that economy including in japan, the united states, china. look at the trade figures worldwide. in 2010 trade grew coming out of the great recession 13.9%, and in 2011 it was 5%, and i think the final figures for last year, 2012, will be somewhere between 2.5 or 2.7. so it's no wonder that you have the problems that you do in major economies worldwide with the slowdown in trade. and i think that unfortunately, i think that we're going to see a continuation of the problems in europe at least for the most part of 2013, just take a look at the latest figures out of germany which was the strongest economy in the eurozone when it came out. and we have our own problems, as you're aware, here in the united states notwithstanding getting by the immediate crisis at th
outlined the new relationships in europe. this is a little bit more than 40 minutes. >> i would like to thank limburg for hosting this this morning. this morning i would like to talk about the future of europe. but first let us remember the past. seven years ago, europe was being torn apart by a catastrophic conflict. the skies of london lit by flames night after night. millions dead across the world in the battle for peace and liberty. as we remember the sacrifice, so we should also remember how the shift in europe for more to sustain peace came about. it didn't happen like a change in the weather. it happened because of determined work over generations and a commitment to friendship and the resolve never to revisit that dark past. a commitment epitomized by the treaty found 50 years ago this week. after the berlin wall came down, i visited that city and i will never forget it. the abandoned checkpoints in the sense of excitement about the future. the knowledge that a great continent was coming together. healing those wounds of our history is the central story of the european union.
david cameron postponed a much-awaited speech on europe to deal with the crisis. >> the algerian prime minister just told me this morning they are now looking at possible routes to resolve this crisis. >> with so many still unaccounted for and reports that some terrorists are still holed up in the installation, the wait continues for news from the remote gas field -- with so many insurgents dating back to a civil war with the country's -- when the country eradicate some of the most violent domestic groups. many -- >> many of the islamists are thought to be a new generation of foreign jihadists, hardened on the battlefields of iraq and afghanistan. >> they've been allowed free rein in mali, and they pose a threat to algeria's hard-1 stability. >> terrorist attacks, mass murder, and torture were everyday occurrences in 1990's algeria. almost 200,000 people lost their lives in a civil war between islamists and the authoritarian regime. the government declared victory in 2002, the low-level fighting has continued. the violence was triggered by the first democratic elections to take place i
call for the chancellor. >> and extreme winter weather halts travel across much of northern europe. >> we start this show in washington where president obama balm has publicly taken the oath of office for his second term. he had to take it twice. >> official ceremony held in private on sunday at the white house. now the ceremonial swearing in in front of more than 700,000 people that showed up. >> and an international audience watching on tv. a lot of europeans want to know which way the world's biggest economy is headed and can politicians sort things out. here is a man that thinks he can make a difference the second time around. obama then looked forward to his next and final four years in office calling an end to the politics of division and saying the united states could achieve anything if it acted as one. >> a decade of war is now ending. an economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all of the qualities this world without boundaries demand, youth and drive, diversity and openness. an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention
optimism as far as europe's future goes. she says that patience is needed for structural reforms to take effect. >> she has also called for more regulation of the finance industry to avoid more turbulence, a point of contention with britain. both agree that competitiveness is the key, but how to go about that is the big question. >> david cameron brought his message with him to the swiss alps. in his address to the world leaders in doubles, he repeated his demands for big changes to the u.s. and britain's relationship to it -- in his address to world leaders in davos. >> i'm not just proposing change for britain. i'm proposing change for europe. we are falling behind in the world, over regulating businesses, adding to much to their costs, and leaving our citizens behind. >> after cameron, all eyes turned to the german chancellor. angela merkel reacted cautiously. she avoided confrontation and focused instead on what the two agree on -- namely the importance of making europe more competitive. >> we, from a european perspective, aspired to become competitive enough to maintain and continue
outlined a framework for new relationship with europe which included more flexibility, democratic accountability and giving power back to member states. this is 45 minutes. >> good morning and i'd like to thank bloomberg very much for hosting me this morning. this morning i want to talk about the future of europe. but first, let us remember the past. 70 years ago, europe was being torn apart by its second catastrophic conflict in a generation. a war which saw the streets of european cities strewn with rubble. the skies of london led by flames night after night. and millions dead across the world in the battle for piece and liberty. as we remember their sacrifice, so we should also remember how the shift in europe from war to sustained piece in about. it didn't happen like a change in the weather. it happened because of determined to work over generations. a commitment to friendship and i resolve never to revisit that dark past, a commitment epitomized by the police a treaty signed 50 years ago this week. after the berlin wall came down, i visited that city and i will never forget
. america is his adopted country and he loves as strongly as we do. he is saying the view -- europe view for economic problems is short. ours is long. we see it coming and yet we still continue to do nothing about it. >> andrea: but we are bigger so when we fall it's a greater fall. it will affect more countries. i respect europeans tell us we look like europe because they know better. when you talk to people who lived in former communist countrys talk about what it's like. they recognize it right away. the slow creep of government. i see what has happened in greece and i see it happening here. we're not exactly like europe. we don't have the cool cafes or speedos. don't get ideas. but obamacare was the biggest indication we're moving in that direction. the last election was the fact that it was on display that the dependency politics the new paradigm. not the typical people becoming dependent but suburban college educated mothers wanting free healthcare and birth control. that is hard to stop >> dana: when you were in germany filming the movies in the 1990s. >> bob: you did? >> dana: it
: europe, seems to be on the mend. coming up the ceo of ever more global advisors will tell us how to invest in what he calls the opportunity of a generation. he's joining us with picks you can not afford to miss. keep it right here on fox business. [ indistinct shouting ] ♪ [ indistinct shouting ] [ male announcer ] time and sales data. split-second stats. [ indistinct shouting ] ♪ it's so close to the options floor... [ indistinct shouting, bell dinging ] ...you'll bust your brain box. ♪ all onhinkorswim from td ameritrade. ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you ake 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. i honestly loved smoking, and i honestly didn't think i would ever quit. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it redus the urge to smoke. it put me at ease that you could smoke on the first week. [ male an
troops arrived in mali as the rebels began a counterattack. >> germany's of the makers look beyond europe to increase sales -- germany's auto makers look beyond europe to increase sales. >> will golden globe -- the golden globe event. austria leaves its mark on the industry. militant islamist fighters have launched a counter offensive in mali as forces moved closer to the capital. french air strikes on the northern strongholds have had little effect with the rebels seizing the central town of diabaly. >> france has poured hundreds of troops into the town. the leader has promised reprises attacks against leaders in mali, africa, and europe. >> france's and intervention in mali is raising questions -- france's sudden intervention in diabaly is raising questions. -- in mali is raising questions. >> how can we help our french neighbor and friend with logistical, political, humanitarian, or medical assistance? >> the french are trying to shore up mali's embattled armed forces, which have been in disarray since last year's coup. the rebels imposed sharia law and are suspected of links to the bo
of europe. every 12 person in france is a follower of islam today, and the numbers are growing. more people are currently reading the koran than the bible. the number of christians in europe has been rapidly declining. the protestant church says today it attracts fewer and fewer people, resulting in an empty church pews in many places, but what do you do when a church building is no longer needed? do you tear it down or give it a new purpose? some disused churches becomes hotels or restaurants, but there are limits to the new uses that church authorities are willing to accept. in germany, for instance, representatives of the catholic and protestant churches have officially recommended not to turn churches into mosques. one village in france has discovered that this can certainly be a delicate issue. >> there's a small catholic community in the heart of france that has too little money and too many churches. the church of the holy virgin is located in historic town center. a few hundred meters away stands the church of st. john the baptist. a few blocks away, we find st. john's a listing whe
leader has promised revenge attacks against the french in mali and africa and europe. paris has told all french nationals to leave the southern town immediately. the embassy ordered the evacuation after rebels came to within 80 kilometers of the town. on the other side of the niger river, one town was seized by insurgents on monday. the fear is if they also manage to take strategically important cities, then the capital could be within their grasp. french forces began launching airstrikes last night on rebel positions to try to dislodge the insurgents. the french president visiting troops in abu dhabi says the mission is going to plan. >> the air strikes hit their targets. some 750 soldiers are currently deployed. we will increase this number so we can hand over to african forces as soon as possible. >> the west african organization is planning to send some 3300 troops to mali as part of a u.n. mission. the french want this to happen soon. >> i have said that the african forces are going to get deployed in the coming days, the coming weeks. the head of the force, a nigerian general, actu
has promised revenge attacks against the french in mali and africa and europe. paris has told all french nationals to leave the southern town immediately. the embassy ordered the evacuation after rebels came to within 80 kilometers of the town. on the other side of the niger river, one town was seized by insurgents on monday. the fear is if they also manage to take strategically important cities, then the capital could be within their grasp. french forces began launching airstrikes last night on rebel positions to try to dislodge the insurgents. the french president visiting troops in abu dhabi says the mission is going to plan. >> the air strikes hit their targets. some 750 soldiers are currently deployed. we will increase this number so we can hand over to african forces as soon as possible. >> the west african organization is planning to send some 3300 troops to mali as part of a u.n. mission. the french want this to happen soon. >> i have said that the african forces are going to get deployed in the coming days, the coming weeks. the head of the force, a nigerian general, actu
of people that were here. we are joined by central bankers from europe, across asia, the americas, as well. and, really, if if there was one take away, sort of a catch phrase, it was 2013 is pretty much going to be a year of fine tuning after 2012. it was a year that you never want to go through again. and central banker after central banker and policymaker after policymaker alluded again and again to what a delicate balance, more so now than ever it is in terms of how much government intervention is not quite enough or maybe just a little bit over the top. case in point, look at australia for the administration. for years has been virtually hell bent on balancing the federal budget. but the reality is the math doesn't work, they say, and wayne swan, the deputy prime minister and treasure for the federal government acknowledged the external factors meant that at a certain point at the end of last year, they had to backtrack or at least delay what they were thinking. >> what has occurred in the last six months has been a very big hit to revenue. that has been caused by global volatility. it
on financial transactions. >> we start with a celebration of a key strategic alliance between europe's two great economies, france and germany. they have been friends for 50 years. >> after centuries of conflict, they culminated in two world wars. speaking at a news conference in berlin, german chancellor angela merkel and french president francois hollande talking about that. >> they promised to unveil proposals in the coming months and it is a big step forward dr. became to power pledging to reverse the plans that merkel had championed. >> it is the first time these bundestag has had a full parliament from another country here. the french president, hollande, recalled the original spirit leading to the historic relationship. >> young people are not only our future but also the reason for the policies that we are pursuing. >> young people in both of our countries have the uncomfortable good fortune that they have never had to experience in it. but peace and democracy. >> he also addressed the economic crisis in europe and chancellor merkel followed suit. she stressed it is necessary. >> w
>> today, public disillusionment with the eu is at an all-time high. referendum on europe's future. you're watching al jazeera. a third term for benjamin is in yahoo! with a narrow win forcing the coalition with new sets of rivals. north korea threatens to step up its nuclear program after the u.n. condemns decembers rocket launch. >> a panel on the country's top court could throw out the jail sentence of a french woman serving time for kidnapping. more coming up. >> britain's prime minister says he will let the public decide if they want to stay in the european union if he's reelected. david cameron ended months of speculation by promising a referendum on the question, it he is backing. 2015. however, he said that he prefers britain to stay in member of the you. -- in the -- state a member of the eu. >> i am not a british isolationist. but i want a better deal for britain. but not just for britain, but for europe, too. i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future of the european union. a future in which britain wants and should want to play a committed
that europe is down, but we've got the sector spanish numbers that suggest big problems. >> well, turning the corner is i think the wrong image. i think the ecb's action have put a floor under things and cut off the tail risk. so for your investor types, they've seen reduction in risk premium and that's given gains in equity. the economy is going to be lousy for the next two years. >> so we're running this online poll which is asking this question, this lack of current crisis that we have, is that because there has been real progress or is it century? >> no. i think it's a product. the ecb has stepped up and merkel and others committed to some day doing the kinds of physical transfers of banking units they need. and there has been some real progress even off that cleanup. but none of that is going to offset the unemployment numbers, barred from that the lack of investment, the constraint on demand from the austerity programs, the feedback in europe. so, again, it is real progress, but that's not going translate to growth anytime soon. >> when you say not going to translate into growth, wh
of europe's content. in belgium, more people turn to handouts to survive the growing economy. -- the grim economy. the russian parliament about a draft law banning homosexual propaganda. there was only one deputy that voted against it in the lower house. outside, passion spilled over to scuffles on the street. police made arrests after the gay-rights supporters were insulted by opponents. steve rosenberg reports from moscow. >> ahead of the debate inside the russian parliament, there was drama outside on the street. gay-rights activists. police detained 20 people. later, military police turned their attention to the controversial bill. pass the first hearing by a huge margin. it will prohibit the spread of homosexual propaganda in the wording which presence of children. it would mean across russia public events promoting gay rights could be broken up and the organizers find -- fined. >> we see open propaganda that harms. young people will decide on their own how to live in the future and what orientation to choose. >> this draft bill sends a bad signal to society of repression and limitat
the whole range of modern humans from western europe right across to siberia. and i think that's part of the fact that modern humans are entering new territories they're covering wider distances and they're having to signal and network with each other. narrator: communicating with others through art and ritual has long been considered a uniquely human trait. joao zilhao: there has been the notion that neanderthals were less intelligent and one way archaeologists have to deal with this question is by assessing the extent to which people used symbols. narrator: evidence of neanderthal symbolism has been elusive until recently. this is one of many fragments of manganese dioxide a black mineral found in a neanderthal cave in france its tip worn down as if used as a crayon. in neanderthal sites in gibraltar archaeologists have discovered cut marks on the wing bones of crows and birds of prey bones with little value as food. the marks suggest neanderthals were cutting off the feathers and using them to decorate their hair or bodies. and in spain, seashells have revealed f
the u.k. compared to continental europe? >> in terms of growth, it is difficult to compare because they go in and out of recession at different times. the unemployment is one of the key ones. britain has done remarkably well. it is something of a mystery, and it has to do with that lowering, that rapid lowering of wages. a lot of people employed at low wages, very competitive with in the u.k., and that is why they are continuing -- they have not managed to do that yet in many of the continental economists. >> thank you very much indeed. extreme weather continues to cause havoc in australia. torrential rains inundated the northern state of queensland while bush fires continue to range -- to rage in the south. a tropical cyclone caused flooding, disrupting road and mail traffic and stranding travelers. its wettest day since 1939. stay with us. coming up we examine london possible olympic legacy. that is all here on bbc world news. much of north america is in the grip of a big winter freeze. temperatures have plunged as low as-bang 34 degrees celsius in some parts. in chicago, cold an
will be back. we'll talk about the rest of the world. europe, the united states, everything. when we come back. and get a case of x-9 paperrkd for only 1-cent after maxperks rewards. find thousands of big deals now... ...at officemax. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're we
the killings on turkey and are calling on europe to stand with them. >> where are the french? where is the solidarity? i think that the state of turkey did this. i think that the whole of europe knows they did this. >> one of the victims was a founder of the pkk separatist group. pkk militants and turkish separatist groups have fought on and off since 2004. tens of thousands of people have died in the conflict. the two sides have had peace talks in recent months. some speculate the murders in paris could be an attempt by hardliners to derail those talks. french police now face an investigation with explosive political implications. >> pakistani police say at least 56 people have been killed and another 100 injured in twin blasts. the attacks took place in the city of quetta. >> witnesses say the first explosion was a suicide bombing. a car bomb went off 10 minutes later as emergency teams and police rushed to the scene of the first blast. the leftist government in venezuela starts a new term in office today despite the absence of president hugo chavez who remains in cuba. the suprem
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,976 (some duplicates have been removed)

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